Skip to main content

About your Search

Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10
.s. engineer who went to china and saw them building a dam. and china's o so interested in having jobs and job creation. and the u.s. engineer goes to china, and he sees them building a dam, and they're all using shovels. and the engineer asks the chinese engineer, why are they using shovels? why don't you have them use modern equipment? we're trying to create jobs. and so the british -- engineer says why don't you give them spoons? [laughter] all jobs are not the same. the idea that we somehow reduce spending or even if we reduce the growth of government spending which would be an important first step does not mean we're going to see retardation in growth levels. those people who actually do capital investment. so i've been arguing as kevin said on entitlement reform. the federal government spent $3.5 trillion last year. of that about 1.5 was social security, medicare and medicaid. three big government expenditure programs are about 45% of government expenditures. those are growing. in 2010 medicare and medicaid combined spent more than social security. social security is a $750 billion progr
the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about before that has grown up in 30 years comes out of the decisions made in the boardroom with the boards of directors and mothor shareholders about the profits. if the workers themseffeces distributed the profits collectively, would they give poor people $4s every body else says not enough? unlikely. the biggest
with china. he goes into panama, in december '89 -- never forgot that because i had -- born on the 4th of july was opening that day, and the american people loved it. they backed the invasion. it was our backyard, it was a war on drugs and that was new issue now. communist had been forgotten. noriega was the new stalin, and then a year later, we had this iraq 1, and that's another untold story. iraq 1 was really depressing when you go into all the false intelligence and the doctoring of the photos. do you want to tell us about that? it breaks my heart personally, and as a veteran of the vietnam war, i see the next ten years we drift. we don't take advantage of the possibles with the soviet union, to keep it stable. we privatize with russia and then by the time the bush 43 comes in, it's not only squandered but the nightmare begins. so it's heartbreaking. >> did you want to comment? >> we see it as a lost opportunity. there's a lot of lost opportunities in the 20th 20th century, in march 5, 1965, when stall yip dies, the stove yet leaders reach out the united states and talk about endin
around the world, china is a huge creditor. we owe them over a trillion, we'll japan over a trillion. governments are holding on to this debt. you know, there is a story. i forget where it was run that mentioned from the peak of the housing double until now they said the average american household net worth was down about 40%. it's actually down a lot more than that when you factor in each share of the debt that has been accumulated in their name by the federal government. so americans are basically already broke. that's why we have to just admit that we are insolvent because the american families cannot repay the money that's been borrowed in their name. so we admit that we are insolvent. greece imposed a hair cut at 50% of the bondholders. we tell people that have one-year treasury bills we can't pay you back in a year. you have to extend the maturity beebee ten years. america has to tell people who are collecting social security right now or who are expecting to collect it they aren't going to get as much money as they were promised. we have to cut the pensions of the retired amid
in essence would serve as sanctions on iran but the point is that china needs to be pressured to stop the loophole in the system internationally that is being created to keep iran from the centrifuge program, and that effort overtime has had tremendous success, and with more and more sanctions it has been more successful. more purchase is stopped, more interdictions and more trouble for iran to make progress on the gas centrifuge program. >> in terms of the nonproliferation program, and david is emphasizing some of the holes that exist particularly in the export controls and the lack of enforcement of existing sanctions legislation what is your assessment of the u.s. nonproliferation program or what can be done and should be done? >> when you hear the sanctions, those are all the things we try to do. and so, there are four things that can be done to force things to have better training in the region if you will, but we also need to look at the demand side as well. what drives the countries to proliferate and then how do you also built in that notion of a non-proliferation, how do you
at very low interest rates. substitute the words the united states and greece, and china to germany and you have a world scale, the problem in the united states. the problem in the whole world. but let me just, following those comments, you know, you've got a single moment. [inaudible] decided to they want more unity or less. because the euro cannot survive unless they have more sense of some kind of central control. more sense of discipline before the crisis. which means some kind of limits on fiscal policy, but one thing, but it goes on fiscal policy. spain had a pretty good fiscal policy. they kept borrowing money to build houses. so we've got to have some kind of oversight of economic policy as part of the price of being in the union. they wanted -- [inaudible] monetary union without the economic union. doesn't work. so the proposals are out there, and i think they basically want to move towards more economic union. a lot of debate, a lot of reluctance. i think they're going to do in the end but this is something you can do overnight. but the fact they're willing to look at is a
lessons in your book -- this may sound like a stretch, the people who live in china. i mean, this government's, it is -- you know, i don't know whether you call it -- certainly there is not the openness. well would you say to the leaders of china about there future? >> well, i would start by saying that the chinese leaders have drawn lessons from the story. the chinese leaders know this piece of history. of course, there's a similar time in their own history. and they also have studied very carefully the 80's in the end of the soviet union. and one of the decisions that they have made based on studying this piece of history is, they have made contemporary china less totalitarian in the sense that they do make people march in parades and they have abandon ideology in the sense of making people repeat things they don't believe in. and the pressures they put on people are coming in that sense, less. it is a much more subtle system where you are allowed to say some things in some context, but not others. you can talk about corruption, but you may be cannot criticize the party di
business as usual with china and goes into panama december 1989. the american people loved it it was our backyard. me noriega was the news dahlin. and that is another untold story. and with the doctor of the photos it breaks my heart personally send a the veteran we don't take advantage of the possibilities with the soviet union reprivatize with russia and then 43, and it is natalie squandered but it is heartbreaking during that period. >> it is a lost opportunity. i agree. >> march 5, 1953 when stalin died the soviet leader's reach out to the united states at that point* but eisenhower had a great speech but then dallas refutes it then they take a hard-line. >> we had a lot of chances.
were running congress when we had a like nafta, china's most favorite nation status, the jvc, the world trade organization. all these trade deals people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case, the jobs left.
short-term debt, not long-term debt because of huge interest rate disc over time. if you look at china in particular, they are now looking at corporate bonds and alternative investments within u.s. treasury securities because they don't like what they see and understandably so. so we are living on borrowed time. we've created another bubble in my view is the reason the fed is doing a kissimmee and it was changed to where they have to be concerned with short-term employment. in the absence of the deck unsustainable over time. >> the most successful fiscal consolidations in the developed democratic world occurred in canada in the mid-1990s. i frankly asked canadian politicians, how did she do it? because the public wind from cheering on spending two and a set deficits within a matter of a year or two so that governments in canada now with some peril if they don't balance the budget. the answer you most frequently to do so they have to do was say that 40% of revenues was going to pay the interest bill and the canadian debt. the public immediately realized i was not a great idea and became
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10